Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Tips’ Category

Turkey is celebration food. And this weekend I had much to celebrate, including a new kitchen!  Beautiful granite countertops, stainless appliances, a gas range — and a dishwasher! — make this a wonderful place to cook a Thanksgiving meal.  And my 12-pound, free-range turkey from Whole Foods did not disappoint: the meat was flavorful and moist, the skin golden crisp.

I stuffed my bird with two whole lemons, garlic cloves, rosemary sprigs, green onion, and parsley.  For beneath the skin, I created a rub of sea salt, cracked pepper, sage, oregano, thyme and garlic.  And in an unusual twist, I took a page out of my mother’s cookbook and covered the bird in cheesecloth soaked in a butter, white wine, orange juice glaze.

The cloth kept the skin infused with flavor as I continued to moisten/baste it every 30 minutes or so. Parts of it did turn dark brown, and I was concerned about it burning, but it didn’t matter.  About 2 hours into the roasting, I removed the cloth and let the skin get crispy. The result was amazing.

Read Full Post »

orgpudcake

At this time of year, grocery store produce aisles are stocked with mounds of bright orange navel oranges and tangerines. The citrusy fruit inspired this take on a soufflé, which is delicately cakey and firm on top and creamy and custard-like on the bottom. The flavor is incredibly light, with a hint of sweetness and citrus from orange and lemon juices and zest.

This is not a difficult preparation, but it does take about 45 minutes to bake in a hot water bath. If you’re not familiar with that technique, the water keeps the heat gentle and oven moisture level high, preventing cracking in the soufflé.  You simply put your filled pan in a larger pan and add enough water to reach halfway up the side of the smaller pan. (Recipe: Gourmet, Dec. 2008)

Read Full Post »


On Thanksgiving this year, I dined with extended family of Austrian descent. And next to the turkey on their spread was a platter of traditional schwein schnitzel, or breaded pork cutlets. The tenderized pork loin fillets were seasoned, breaded and panfried in olive oil. Often the dish is also served with a lemon, parsley and caper sauce, fried egg and several strips of anchovies.

As chef Roswitha Cusick demonstrates for Peanutbuttermilk, these delicious and crispy schnitzel are easy to make and a fitting complement to any traditional Austrian holiday meal.

Read Full Post »

As a newcomer to New York City, one of the things I’ve enjoyed about living here is the prevalence of fruit stands and street markets. They are everywhere, and the produce is wonderfully displayed and very fresh (most of the time!).  The Greenmarket once a week near the Columbia University campus is particularly impressive, with produce trucked in from the upstate NY countryside. Really excellent fruit and vegetables and fresh baked goods.

Here’s a photo series of the market on Broadway and 114th.

Workers unload produce for Thursday's Greenmarket.

Workers unload produce for Thursday

Carole Foster unpacks fresh upstate tomatoes.

Carole Foster unpacks fresh upstate tomatoes.

Kalsang Tsering prepares the potatoes and onions for display.

Kalsang Tsering prepares the potatoes and onions for display.

Kalsang Tsering takes a breather among upstate apples.

Kalsang Tsering takes a breather among upstate apples.

New York apples

New York apples

Margaret Hoffman, Greenmarket coordinator, enjoys an apple.

Margaret Hoffman, Greenmarket coordinator, enjoys an apple.

Check out the Council on the Environment in NYC for more information on Greenmarket. There are 44 locations around town.

Read Full Post »

We have all been there…you have a main dish you have worked hard on and then, oh!, you realize you need a side to go along with it, something healthy and delightful to the senses. My good ‘ole sister-in-law Maggie clued me in on one of the best accompaniments out there, and one of the easiest!

 

Buy a big head of broccoli, chop off all the little crowns, place them in a shallow dish, lightly salt and pepper them. Put a little water in the bottom of the dish, maybe 1/4 inch. Squeeze an entire lemon over the top of the broccoli. Wrap parchment paper around your dish to provide a little steaming insulation. Steam in the microwave for two minutes — it probably won’t be done, but see if it is al dente and, if not, microwave in 30-second intervals until it’s just perfect.

 

This dish complements almost anything — everyone will love it!

Read Full Post »

Among the memories I have of summertime visits to grandma’s house are the mounds of fresh-picked vegetables that would be piled on her kitchen counter. My mom, brother and I never left grandma’s house without a brown paper bag filled with an assortment of her goodies: Cucumbers, squash, green beans, rhubarb, carrots, tomatoes… If we were lucky, we also got a jar of her homemade pickled beets, tub of homemade apple sauce, or a container of refrigerator pickles.

I love dill pickles, and one of my favorite summer traditions is enjoying fresh, cold slices of cucumber that have been marinating in onion, sugar, salt, vinegar and garlic — in the fridge. These “refrigerator pickles” make a great accompaniment to any summer meal.

Last weekend, I got a tip from Diane on one quick way to “pickle” those cucumbers picked in the garden. She writes:

“To be honest, we were almost out of pickles, but we had cucumbers that I just picked from the garden. So, I sliced our fresh cucumbers and put them in the Vlasic jar that had the last pickles in it- the cukes soaked up some of that juice. I happen to like Vlasic flavoring, I think it has a perfect balance of tart, garlic and spice. I thought it would be good in a pinch, and actually, they came out tasting better than I hoped!”

Read Full Post »

Mom marinated the skinless chicken thighs and legs overnight in the buttermilk mixture. Then, she lightly coated them in the flour mixture before frying stove-top in a cast iron skillet. After frying, she baked chicken in the oven for 15-20 minutes. Check out the entire recipe here

TIP: When she started frying, the oil created quite a mess by spattering all over the stove area. Then we remembered that we have a splatter screen! The $15 transparent kitchen device sits on top of pots and pans with bubbling oil and all but eliminates the greasy mess. 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »